Hybrid puffer fish could cause food confusion in Japan

Image copyright
AFP

Image caption

The pufferfish’s potentially lethal internal organs need to be removed before cooking

A new hybrid species of puffer fish could end up on the plates of Japanese diners, with the risk that chefs not familiar with its anatomy may fail to remove its notoriously deadly poison.

Experts are blaming climate change for the arrival of the new species, where the Spottyback puffer has started to migrate from its usual habitat in the Sea of Japan (also known as the East Sea) to the Pacific Ocean, where it has been mixing with the native Shosai-fugu.

A survey carried out by Japan’s National Fisheries University found that over half of the puffers, or fugu, studied in a three-year programme were Spottyback-Shosai-fugu hybrids.

The result, the Mainichi Daily News reports, is a hybrid species that is proving difficult to identify at fish markets. Despite government advice on identifying the new species, many are being discarded for the sake of safety.

The university’s Professor Hiroshi Takahashi told The Mainichi there is now an increased possibility that hybrids will end up on consumers’ plates.

Deadly catch

The problem faced by biologists and chefs alike is in correctly identifying the new species of fugu, so that its liver, ovaries and other organs which carry a deadly neurotoxin can be removed before preparation for the table.

It’s a genuine danger, because even the tiniest error could kill. With the fish currently being identified by hand, Professor Takahashi has called for new methods to scientifically screen puffers to head off potential fatalities due to incorrectly identified fugu.

There could be another way around the problem for Japanese diners though, who can pay up to 35,000 yen ($315; £245) for a puffer fish meal.

Some researchers claim to have reared…

Continue reading from the original source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *